Searching Saturday #3: Non-Fiction Books

Hello everybody! I am here again with the new meme / series created by Nikki @ The night is dark and full of book. For Searching Saturday, each Saturday has a new topic and you talk about books that fit into that topic to add to your TBR or just to inform your readers about. For info on how to join in, click here. Without further hesitation, let’s get into this Searching Saturday.

nonfiction

This week’s topic is Non-Fiction Books.

Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly

I just recently read this one and I fell in love with it. Since this one is less about own life, and more about information from the past, it was a different kind of non-fiction and I actually enjoyed it. It was like a cool and empowering form of school.

51o1si8z4sl “Set against the backdrop of the Jim Crow South and the civil rights movement, the never-before-told true story of NASA’s African-American female mathematicians who played a crucial role in America’s space program—and whose contributions have been unheralded, until now.

Before John Glenn orbited the Earth or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of professionals worked as “Human Computers,” calculating the flight paths that would enable these historic achievements. Among these were a coterie of bright, talented African-American women. Segregated from their white counterparts by Jim Crow laws, these “colored computers,” as they were known, used slide rules, adding machines, and pencil and paper to support America’s fledgling aeronautics industry, and helped write the equations that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.

Drawing on the oral histories of scores of these “computers,” personal recollections, interviews with NASA executives and engineers, archival documents, correspondence, and reporting from the era, Hidden Figures recalls America’s greatest adventure and NASA’s groundbreaking successes through the experiences of five spunky, courageous, intelligent, determined, and patriotic women: Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson, Christine Darden, and Gloria Champine.

Moving from World War II through NASA’s golden age, touching on the civil rights era, the Space Race, the Cold War, and the women’s rights movement, Hidden Figures interweaves a rich history of scientific achievement and technological innovation with the intimate stories of five women whose work forever changed the world—and whose lives show how out of one of America’s most painful histories came one of its proudest moments.” – Goodreads | Review

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Binge by Tyler Oakley

I have not read this one yet but I have wanted to get it ever since it came out. I loved the cover and the fact that it was about one of my favorite YouTubers and his life and how he grew up.

916qvngy1fl “Pop culture phenomenon, social rights advocate, and the most prominent LGBTQ+ voice on YouTube, Tyler Oakley brings you his first collection of witty, personal, and hilarious essays written in the voice that’s earned him more than 10 million followers across social media.” – Goodreads

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Really Professional Internet Person by Jenn McAllister

I haven’t read this one either but I have it on my shelf when I got it for cheap when my local Hastings was closing down and I found it. Another one of my favorite YouTubers and her life and I’m gonna have to get to it soon to see what it’s about.

41xrwv-d-al-_sx258_bo1204203200_ “Jenn McAllister, better known as JennxPenn, has been obsessed with making videos since she found her parents video camera at the age of eight. A shy child, Jenn turned to film because, unlike life, there can always be a do-over.

Really Professional Internet Person offers both an insider’s guide to building a successful YouTube channel and an intimate portrait of the surreality of insta-fame and the harsh reality of high school.

Brimming with honesty, heart and Jenn’s patented sense of humor, Really Professional Internet Person features top ten lists, photos, screenshots, social media posts and never-before-posted stories chronicling Jenn’s journey from an anxious middle-schooler just trying to fit in, to a YouTube sensation unafraid to stand out.” – Goodreads

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A Work in Progress by Connor Franta

Another one I haven’t read yet and have been dying to! Another beautiful cover on a book of a YouTuber that I love oh so much.

51oew63zlyl-_sy344_bo1204203200_ “In this intimate memoir of life beyond the camera, Connor Franta shares the lessons he has learned on his journey from small-town boy to Internet sensation so far.

Here, Connor offers a look at his Midwestern upbringing as one of four children in the home and one of five in the classroom; his struggles with identity, body image, and sexuality in his teen years; and his decision to finally pursue his creative and artistic passions in his early twenties, setting up his thrilling career as a YouTube personality, philanthropist, entrepreneur, and tastemaker.

Exploring his past with insight and humor, his present with humility, and his future with hope, Connor reveals his private struggles while providing heartfelt words of wisdom for young adults. His words will resonate with anyone coming of age in the digital era, but at the core is a timeless message for people of all ages: don’t be afraid to be yourself and to go after what you truly want.

This full-color collection includes photography and childhood clippings provided by Connor and is a must-have for anyone inspired by his journey.” – Goodreads

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The Glass Castle by Jeannette Walls

Another one that I have read. My friend recommended this to me a few years ago and it was my first Non-fiction of this sort about someone’s life and how they grew up. I really enjoyed it.

71vbpx0qsml “The Glass Castle is a remarkable memoir of resilience and redemption, and a revelatory look into a family at once deeply dysfunctional and uniquely vibrant. When sober, Jeannette’s brilliant and charismatic father captured his children’s imagination, teaching them physics, geology, and how to embrace life fearlessly. But when he drank, he was dishonest and destructive. Her mother was a free spirit who abhorred the idea of domesticity and didn’t want the responsibility of raising a family.

The Walls children learned to take care of themselves. They fed, clothed, and protected one another, and eventually found their way to New York. Their parents followed them, choosing to be homeless even as their children prospered.

The Glass Castle is truly astonishing–a memoir permeated by the intense love of a peculiar but loyal family.” – Goodreads


That’s all for today! Do you watch any YouTubers? If so, who and do they have a book out? Have you read it? – Kambria

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